Recent Blog Posts


The Richness of the Creed

Posted on June 15, 2016

 It was not a call I’d been expecting. Who would have thought that the world’s most famous composer of evangelical worship music would be calling me?

I had been part of that world—an evangelical pastor in a Calvinist church, deeply engaged in the public conversation about cultural and theological issues. But with my conversion to Catholicism in 1986 I became persona non grata to many of my old friends and colleagues....


The Creed: Yesterday and Today

Posted on June 08, 2016

The following is from Scott Hahn’s latest book, The Creed: Professing the Faith Through the Ages, now available through Emmaus Road Publishing.

Gregory of Nyssa, both brilliant and holy, was recognized by his contemporaries and peers as a man who most perfectly embodied the Council of Constantinople—the council that produced the creed we call “Nicene” and recite every Sunday. The Emperor Theodosius decreed that communion with Gregory was...


Right & Just

Posted on April 28, 2016

From the time of King David onward, an attitude of gratitude dominated the worship of the Temple in Jerusalem. Every day, the priests offered blood sacrifices to atone for the sins of God’s people. But the sacrifice most commonly offered, the sacrifice that exercised the most powerful influence on the spirituality of the Jews, was the Todah. 


The Todah, the thank-offering, was a sacrificial meal of bread and wine. If you had been...


Come to the Feast: Study and Dialogue

Posted on April 21, 2016

My consumption of books, I confess, has sometimes bordered on the gluttonous. I used to haunt library sales, yard sales, and garage sales. When I traveled for business, I’d routinely spend my meal allowance on books, which I devoured in between meetings, on public transportation, in waiting rooms—wherever, whenever. I would forgo sleep to read still more.


My reading habits became the subject of good- natured jokes in my extended family. When...


Scott Hahn Reflects on “The Hour”

Posted on January 12, 2016

"The Hour" of Jesus is a key theme in the Gospel for the Second Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C). Indeed, it's a key theme in the entire Gospel of John.

Literally, "The Hour" of Jesus is the time of His crucifixion, His self-offering on the cross.

But there is also a "spiritual" way to read the passages that refer to Jesus' hour - a way of reading that reveals how "The Hour" of...


Jesus and the Last Supper

Posted on January 06, 2016

For decades, biblical theologians have used the tools of historical criticism to drive a wedge between the Jesus of history and the Jesus of faith. Now, thanks to the work of St. Paul Center Fellow Dr. Brant Pitre, those same tools are being used to demonstrate that no such wedge ever truly existed. There has always been only one Jesus, the Jesus of history and faith. 

In his newest book, Jesus and the Last Supper, Pitre...


New Song by Scott Hahn

Posted on December 21, 2015

Isaiah 52:7–10

Psalms 98:1–6

Hebrews 1:1–6

John 1:1–18

 

 

The Church’s liturgy rings in Christmas with a joyful noise. We hear today of uplifted voices, trumpets and horns, and melodies of praise. 

In the First Reading, Isaiah fortells Israel’s liberation from captivity and exile in Babylon. He envisions a triumphant homecoming to Zion marked by joyful singing.


The New ‘Ark’

Posted on December 14, 2015

The Church in her liturgy and tradition has long praised Mary as “the Ark of the New Covenant.” We see biblical roots for this in the readings for the Fourth Sunday in Advent (Cycle C).

Compare Mary’s visitation to Elizabeth with the story of David returning the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem and you’ll hear interesting echoes.

As Mary “set out” for the hill country of...


The Angel and Mary: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception

Posted on December 07, 2015

Readings:
Genesis 3:9-15, 20
Psalm 98:1-4
Ephesians 1:3-6, 11-12
Luke 1:26-38

In the Gospel for the Fourth Sunday in Advent, the angel Gabriel greets Mary in an unusual way: "Hail, favored one" (see Luke 1:28).


Kecharitomene, the Greek word translated as "favored one," is very rare, used in only one other place in the New Testament. It comes from charis, the Greek word for "grace" and basically means "made full of...


Celebrating Ten Years of Journey Through Scripture

Posted on October 12, 2015

2015 marks the tenth anniversary of the St. Paul Center’s Journey Through Scripture Bible Study Program in Catholic parishes. Over the past decade, the Program has grown to become one of the most popular of its kind in the country, with each of the six studies helping Catholics discover the connections between the Old and New Testaments, the Bible and the Liturgy, and the sacraments and everyday life. 

Across the country, we&rsquo...