Recent Blog Posts


Is Peter the Rock? (Part 3: Some Reasons I Think He Is)

Posted on September 08, 2010

As I explained in the last post in this series, Gundry has made the case that Jesus’ use of petros / petra was intended to highlight the fact that Peter was not the foundation but that the church would be built upon Jesus’ own words.

While this reading may at first seem possible, a number of observations, in my opinion, render such an approach highly implausible. In sum, I would suggest that while Gundry’s...


Matthias Scheeben on the Mysteries of Christianity (Part 3)

Posted on September 02, 2010

“The fascination of mystery is so strong that almost all religious and social organizations that exercise or have exercised an inspiring and lasting influence on mankind have wrapped themselves up in the obscurity of mystery, and have even gloried in the mysteries which they were aware of, although they disdained Christianity because of its mysteries. Their mysteries, products of human invention, are of course mere caricatures of the divine mysteries. Either they are plain mystifications with which to...


Is Peter the Rock? (Part 2: Gundry's Take)

Posted on August 31, 2010

In his detailed commentary on Matthew, Robert Gundry makes the argument that Jesus was purposeful in using different words in his declaration to Peter—“you are petros, and on this petra I will build my church” (Matt 16:18).

Gundry is representative of many Protestant commentators. His view: the rock the Church is built upon is decidedly not Peter, but something else. In Gundry’s view, the petra, the “rock”, is the very...


Is Peter the Rock? (Part 1)

Posted on August 30, 2010

Heads-up. Let’s get ready to rumble! Over the next coming days I’m going to spend some time here looking at one of the most debated passages in all of the Gospels. So, here we go. . .
In Matthew 16:13–20 we read the famous confession of faith by Peter at Caesarea Philippi. In response to his statement affirming him as the “Son of the Living God,” Jesus tells Peter: “I tell you, you...


Matthias Scheeben on the Mysteries of Christianity (Part 2)

Posted on August 17, 2010

“Far from repudiating Christianity or regarding it with suspicious eyes because of its mysteries, we ought to recognize its divine grandeur in these very mysteries. So essential to Christianity are its mysteries that in its character of truth revealed by the Son of God and the Holy Spirit it would stand convicted of intrinsic contradiction if it brought forward no mysteries. Its Author would carry with Him a poor recommendation for His divinity if he taught us only...


Matthias Scheeben on the Mysteries of Christianity (Part 1)

Posted on August 16, 2010

One of my all-time favorite theologians is Matthias Joseph Scheeben (pronounced: “shay-ben”), an obscure German theologian who lived in the 19th century. I want to post up some of what he has said about the mysterious dimension of the Christian faith. Before I do that though, a little bio.


Biography


Eugene Druwé gives a short biography of Scheeben in the a preface to Scheeben’s two volume work on...


A Pilgrimage to Our Lady

Posted on August 02, 2010

The month of August is like a Marian pilgrimage to me. We trek halfway through the sunnier side of the month to reach Our Lady’s feast days, her glorious Assumption on August 15th and her Queenship a week later. Then we return home in the shadier half of the month, as the days get a little shorter and my part of the world heads toward autumn.

We should bring her flowers, you and I&mdash...


Holy Father

Posted on July 02, 2010

So I found myself in Rome a second time this year.

The first time I spent my days searching the Scriptures with young priests and future priests, seeding long lifetimes of future preaching and prayer.

This time I was able to spend some time in conversation with an older priest who certainly doesn’t need my advice about his homilies or his prayer life.

So when I met with Pope Benedict XVI...


Fathers Forever

Posted on June 08, 2010

“You are a priest forever!”

Catholics find joy in that verse, first uttered in the Old Testament and then echoed in the New. In Psalm 110 it refers to the Son of David—specifically to King Solomon, but also to all the men in his line who occupied the throne. They were not only kings, but priests as well. They were mediators between God and man, anointed to offer sacrifice. In the Letter to the...


St. Paul Center Pilgrimage and Dr. Hahn’s Talk

Posted on June 01, 2010
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