Sunday Bible Reflections

Sunday Bible Reflections

This Sunday

Seeing the Son of David: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Today’s Gospel turns on an irony—it is a blind man, Bartimaeus, who becomes the first besides the apostles to recognize Jesus as the Messiah. And His healing is the last miracle Jesus performs before entering the holy city of Jerusalem for His last week on earth. The scene on the ...
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Recent Reflections

Cup of Salvation: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

The sons of Zebedee hardly know what they’re asking in today’s Gospel. They are thinking in terms of how the Gentiles rule, of royal privileges and honors. But the road to Christ’s kingdom is by way of His cross. To share in His glory, we must be willing to drink ... Read More

Wisdom and Riches: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

The rich young man in today’s Gospel wanted to know what we all want to know—how to live in this life so that we might live forever in the world to come. He sought what today’s Psalm calls “wisdom of heart.” He learns that the wisdom he seeks is not ... Read More

What God Has Joined: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

In today’s Gospel, the Pharisees try to trap Jesus with a trick question. The “lawfulness” of divorce in Israel was never an issue. Moses had long ago allowed it (see Deuteronomy 24:1–4). But Jesus points His enemies back before Moses, to “the beginning,” interpreting the text we hear in today’s ... Read More

To Belong to Christ: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-sixth Sunday Ordinary Time

Today’s Gospel begins with a scene that recalls a similar moment in the history of Israel, the episode recalled in today’s First Reading. The seventy elders who receive God’s Spirit through Moses prefigure the ministry of the apostles. Like Joshua in the First Reading, John makes the mistake of presuming ... Read More

Servant of All: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

In today’s First Reading, it’s like we have our ears pressed to the wall and can hear the murderous grumblings of the elders, chief priests, and scribes—who last week Jesus predicted would torture and kill Him (see Mark 8:31; 10:33–34). The liturgy invites us to see this passage from the ... Read More

Following the Messiah: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

In today’s Gospel, we reach a pivotal moment in our walk with the Lord. After weeks of listening to His words and witnessing His deeds, along with the disciples we’re asked to decide who Jesus truly is. Peter answers for them, and for us, too, when he declares: “You are ... Read More

All Things Well: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

The incident in today’s Gospel is recorded only by Mark. The key line is what the crowd says at the end: “He has done all things well.” In the Greek, this echoes the creation story, recalling that God saw all the things he had done and declared them good (see ... Read More

Pure Religion: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

Today’s Gospel casts Jesus in a prophetic light, as one having authority to interpret God’s law. Jesus’ quotation from Isaiah today is ironic (see Isaiah 29:13). In observing the law, the Pharisees honor God by ensuring that nothing unclean passes their lips. In this, however, they’ve turned the law inside ... Read More

A Choice to Make: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time

This Sunday’s Mass readings conclude a four-week meditation on the Eucharist. The Twelve Apostles in today’s Gospel are asked to make a choice—either to believe and accept the New Covenant He offers in His Body and Blood, or return to their former ways of life ... Read More

Wisdom’s Feast: Scott Hahn Reflects on the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Wisdom of God has prepared a feast, we hear in today’s First Reading. We must become like children (see Matthew 18:3–4) to hear and accept this invitation. For in every Eucharist, it is the folly of the Cross that is represented and renewed. To the world, it is foolishness ... Read More
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